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Edinburgh Fringe offers free tickets to children in care

Access Fringe: Looked-After Children, will give young people living in council-run care institutions complimentary tickets to fringe shows Access Fringe: Looked-After Children, will give young people living in council-run care institutions complimentary tickets to fringe shows
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A new scheme has been launched that will provide free Edinburgh Fringe tickets to more than 1,400 children living in care in the Scottish capital.

The project, named Access Fringe: Looked-After Children, will give young people living in council-run care institutions complimentary tickets to fringe shows – in a move organisers say will widen access to the festival.

The launch of the scheme midway through this year’s Edinburgh Fringe follows a smaller-scale version of the same project which was run last year as a pilot.

Kath Mainland, chief executive of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe Society, said: “We want to help provide some of the most disadvantaged children and young people in the city an opportunity to experience the Edinburgh Festival Fringe – an opportunity they would not normally have due to economic and social reasons.”

She continued: “I truly believe access to, and engagement with the arts is fundamental for people of all ages and I’m overjoyed we are in the position to be able to offer young people and children of Edinburgh the chance to get involved and be inspired at this year’s Fringe.”

Mainland added that the scheme was part of a wider drive to increase the accessibility of the Edinburgh Fringe, explaining: “It is important that everyone who wants to come and be part of this festival – whether as performers or audience members – can do so.

“So this is one of a series of initiatives over the years to come to tackle the physical, economic, social and geographic barriers that stop people from participating.”

City of Edinburgh Council and Virgin Money have both helped fund the scheme, which will run until the end of the Edinburgh Fringe on August 31.

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