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Snow White and Rose Red review at Battersea Arts Centre, London – ‘delightfully raucous’

Abbi Greenland as Rose Red and Helen Goalen in Snow White and Rose Red at Battersea Arts Centre. London. Photo: The Other Richard Abbi Greenland as Rose Red and Helen Goalen in Snow White and Rose Red at Battersea Arts Centre. London. Photo: The Other Richard

Battersea Arts Centre’s Christmas show is frequently one of the hippest in town. RashDash’s gig theatre take on famous fairytales, originally commissioned and co-produced by Cambridge Junction in 2015, comes in a long line of delightfully raucous family entertainment from companies such as Kneehigh and Little Bulb. Still, you won’t have seen anything quite like it.

Fans of dance theatre company RashDash will be treated to a festive version of its work mixing shadow puppetry, ballads, James Bond parody and Robert Plant style ululation. Those new to the company will be in for a treat.

Sisters Snow White and Rose Red do seem to bear passing resemblance to the characters in the Grimm brothers’ stories, but they are also very recognisable as 30-year-olds of today – at least as far as romance is concerned. Not ones to hang around, they brave the wilderness to follow their heart even if it means contending with the elements, bearded hipster villains, and terrifying monsters.

Their quest is overseen by a piano-playing Snow Angel (regular collaborator Beckie Wilkie) delivering wry commentary and some deus ex machina interventions when necessary.

Aimed at ages six and above, the production could stand to be more concise in parts, but this heart-melting two hours contains something for everyone.

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Verdict
RashDash’s vibrant fusion of rock, pantomime, fairytale and feminism
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