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The Little Boy That Santa Claus Forgot review at Macrobert Stirling

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Santa Claus is a rumble-tummied, forgetful old man known as Mr McGregor in Oliver Emanuel and Gareth Nicholls’ delightful play for three to six year-olds at Macrobert.

If Billy Riddoch’s avuncular Santa doesn’t get his audience on side, popping brussels sprouts and deciding which garish tie to wear on Christmas morning in his newspaper-strewn house, his fruity parping soon does.

This, clearly, is a good Christmas day. Even for his pet turkey Belinda. Except that the forgetful old man has omitted to drop a present off for his one true friend, Andrew Fraser’s engaging paper boy, Johnny. Who now hates Christmas. And before you know it, several years have passed and Christmas has been officially cancelled.

The passage of years and rediscovery of the pair’s joy in life is a scrumptious piece of storytelling, cleverly constructed in Oliver Emanuel’s script – with carefully-placed nods for the adults. Claire Halleran’s cluttered-house set opens up splendidly to reveal all sorts of tricks and Christmas delights as Johnny takes on Mr McGregor’s job.

Add a cleverly constructed score by Daniel Krass – heard on DJ Chris Tingle (Rosalind Sydney)’s radio station – and you have a subtle tale of growing up and the importance of remembering to add to its seasonal cheer.

Production Information

Macrobert, Stirling, December 5-29

Author
Oliver Emanuel
Director
Gareth Nicholls
Producer
Macrobert
Cast
Billy Riddoch, Andrew Fraser
Running time
40mins

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