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Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea review at BAC London

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Young company 1927’s sinister cabaret was a hit on this year’s Edinburgh fringe, and now feels right at home at a BAC transformed for the gothic delights of The Masque of the Red Death next door.

Like its neighbour, Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea transports its audience to a bygone era, embracing the quaint aesthetic of silent movies, but injecting a healthy dose of modern satire.

A series of surreal vignettes about twisted fairytales, evil children, perverted housewives and rebellious gingerbread men are told with panache by two impeccably spoken actor-mimes and their well-dressed pianist – who occasionally halts the show to take tea.

Live performance fuses inventively with film and animation, as Choo Choo Le Chat blows smoke rings on to the giant screen and rises up to heaven in front of our eyes, after meeting with death for the ninth time.

Award-winning animator Paul Bill Barritt is arguably the real star of the show, his creations often working as stand-alone pieces, such as the deliciously twisted Biscuit Tin Revolution.

Overall it’s a slight production, and one concerned with spectacle above all else, but that doesn’t detract from its technical and atmospheric brilliance.

Production Information

BAC, London, October 15-November 3

Author
Suzanne Andrade
Producer
1927
Cast includes
Suzanne Andrade, Esme Appleton, Lillian Henley
Running time
1hr
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