REVIEWS

Eight minutes is the time it takes for a photon – the fundamental particle of visible light – to travel from the sun to...

After more than two decades, the Greenwich and Docklands International Festival is still going strong, with an accessible, eclectic line up of exciting outdoor...

Jess Latowicki and Chris Brett Bailey are trying to put on a show: there’s a bit of comedy, a dance routine. But their efforts...

James Graham’s new play Ink, about the rise of The Sun newspaper, is a fascinating study of Fleet Street as it once was. The Sun...

Audra McDonald is a performer of great vocal prowess and precision. A six-time Tony-winner, she has a rich, operatic voice, and in Lady Day...

Martin Duncan’s 2011 production of Rossini’s frothy and at times acerbic comedy makes its first return at Garsington. It’s an evening that delivers on many...

Mozart composed Mitridate, King of Pontus when he was just 14 for the predecessor of La Scala, Milan. It’s representative of the serious opera...

Beethoven’s message in his only opera, Fidelio, is that love and courage can counter oppression and leverage freedom. It’s a testament to the universality of...

London's Union Theatre continues its mission to revive neglected British musicals that emerged during the 1980s and 1990s mega-show bonanza years. Having recently and misguidedly...

The Donmar Warehouse’s film of their all-female Julius Caesar is a labour of love. Directed by Phyllida Lloyd, it’s definitely a filmed performance rather...

This summer, Albert Herring, Benjamin Britten’s comic opera of repression, rum-laced lemonade and rites of passage celebrates 70 years since its premiere at Glyndebourne. The...

Steve Rodgers’s 2012 play Food (receiving its first production outside Australia) is an abrasive affair, more of a haphazard buffet than a satisfying meal. It’s...
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