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REVIEWS

Glitter balls, sequins and lame jokes. Strictly Come Dancing is now in its 11th year, it has a formula that works and it’s sticking...

Accusing any performance of Brecht’s ferociously didactic Fear and Misery of the Third Reich of lacking subtlety may seem redundant. Yet while his 1938...

Camden People Theatre’s feminist theatre festival Calm Down Dear gets off to a cracking start with Racheal Ofori’s So Many Reasons. It’s a smart...

Harold Pinter’s early play The Birthday Party is a famously murky piece of work, by turns sinister and absurd. Ian Rickson’s production boasts a glorious...

A refreshing take on an under-performed Christopher Marlowe play showcasing young acting talent sounds like a great idea. But it fails to deliver on...

Following an extensive refit of the Landor pub's upper floor, the Landor Space in North Clapham has been created as a multi-purpose conference and...

Asylum seeker Serge (Ncuti Gatwa) greets the audience with an effusive speech about storytelling. He is joined by Nick Blakeley as A, an unnamed...

How do you tackle a Shakespeare play that people consider a problem? One answer, at least for the Globe’s outgoing artistic director Emma Rice,...

Roland Petit’s Le Jeune Homme et la Mort is a succinct, sexually charged work – particularly for 1946 when it premiered. From the moment Ivan...

For all its wit and whimsy, the world of Betes de Foire – Petit Theatre de Gestes, created and performed by Elsa de Witte...

When it was published in 1924, EM Forster’s A Passage to India was provocative. Now, its metaphysical musings about existence feel naive in the...

Another opening night, another sad memorial. The first performance of this revival of Jonathan Kent’s Tosca, first seen in 2006, was dedicated to the...
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