dfp_header_hidden_string

Get our free email newsletter with just one click

Diary: Morecambe Winter Gardens sitting pretty for the future

Morecambe Winter Gardens. Photo: Nilfanion Morecambe Winter Gardens. Photo: Nilfanion
by -

The world feels depressing sometimes, doesn’t it? Brexit’s a mess, party politics is messier, and the blissful summer we needed – and let’s face it, deserved – has been so cruelly snatched away, leaving us barely able to make out our Mr Whippys through the driving rain and pining for last year’s unbeatable heatwave.

But all is not lost. Not for Morecambe Winter Gardens at least, which is experiencing a decidedly sunnier outlook having spent the past 40 years thinking it had lost hundreds of historic theatre seats only to find them pop up out of the blue on eBay. The long-missing seats were removed by the Lancashire theatre in the late 1970s and their subsequent whereabouts had remained a hotly contested mystery ever since.

According to the BBC, the theatre had thought the 400 seats had either been destroyed or, for reasons not entirely clear, sent to Australia. Quite the opposite it turns out – the seats had been residing just 35 miles up the road in a masonic hall all along. Eagle-eyed bargain hunters spotted them listed on eBay, and the Winter Gardens is now planning to buy them back.

The theatre is coincidentally in the midst of a major restoration project to return the building to its former glory, so here’s hoping some of this fortuitous timing can be replicated in time to find that proper summer we seem to have misplaced.

tabard@thestage.co.uk

We need your help…

When you subscribe to The Stage, you’re investing in our journalism. And our journalism is invested in supporting theatre and the performing arts.

The Stage is a family business, operated by the same family since we were founded in 1880. We do not receive government funding. We are not owned by a large corporation. Our editorial is not dictated by ticket sales.

We are fully independent, but this means we rely on revenue from readers to survive.

Help us continue to report on great work across the UK, champion new talent and keep up our investigative journalism that holds the powerful to account. Your subscription helps ensure our journalism can continue.

loading...
^