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Diary: Flamboyant clairvoyant Su Pollard foresees shotgun wedding

Pollard (second from right) with pals Wayne Sleep, Christopher Biggins and Celia Imrie at the West End Flea Market. Photo Mark Lomas Pollard (second from right) with pals Wayne Sleep, Christopher Biggins and Celia Imrie at the West End Flea Market. Photo Mark Lomas
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Watching Eurovision on Saturday evening, one might have been under the impression Su Pollard was a last-minute entry. The Ukranian entry was definitely wearing what could easily have been a trademark Pollard outfit.

It was unlikely Pollard would have been in Tel Aviv for this year’s event, however, given she was due to appear on Sunday at the West End Flea Market – the first of its kind in Theatreland and all in the name of charity, with proceeds going to Acting for Others.

First West End flea market raises £26k for charity

Pollard was on hand to tell the fortunes of unsuspecting attendees at this year’s event. Tabard hears that she was a big hit, with a queue forming around the block of people eager to have the former Hi-de-Hi! star give them an insight into what they can expect from life.

The team from Sunday Show Tunes had their fortunes told, and Pollard predicted marriage – within the next three weeks. That doesn’t give them very long to plan, does it? Perhaps Pollard, or the Ukranian Eurovision entry, has an outfit or two lying around for the bride.

At the end of the event, organisers totted up how much Pollard had raised from her mystic musings – a grand total of £370, which went to the overall pot of £26,000. Well done, all. Tabard predicts more well-meaning silliness from Pollard in the future. But then, you don’t need to be psychic to know that.

tabard@thestage.co.uk

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