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Top 5 theatre shows to see this week (August 12-18)

Yasmin Paige and Simon Manyonda in rehearsals for Actually. Photo: Lidia Crisafulli Yasmin Paige and Simon Manyonda in rehearsals for Actually. Photo: Lidia Crisafulli
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Actually – Trafalgar Studios, London

Anna Ziegler’s last play in the UK was Photograph 51, starring Nicole Kidman. Her 2017 play about race, consent and unconscious bias opens on August 12.

Jerry Springer the Opera – Hope Mill Theatre, Manchester

Richard Thomas and Stewart Lee’s irreverent musical famously infuriated Christian groups and received more than 50,000 complaints when it was broadcast on the BBC. James Baker’s revival for the Hope Mill opens on August 13.

The cast in rehearsals for Jerry Springer the Opera. Photo: Kai Jolley
The cast in rehearsals for Jerry Springer the Opera. Photo: Kai Jolley

Oedipus – King’s Theatre, Edinburgh

Robert Icke’s production of Sophocles’ tragedy for Internationaal Theater Amsterdam, told in real time with a clock counting down the minutes, opens on August 14 as part of the Edinburgh International Festival.

A scene from Oedipus. Photo: Jan Versweyveld
A scene from Oedipus. Photo: Jan Versweyveld

Red Dust Road – Lyceum Theatre, Edinburgh

Tanika Gupta adapts the memoir by Scottish poet and playwright Jackie Kay about the search for her biological mother. The National Theatre of Scotland production, directed by Dawn Walton, opens on August 14.

Playwright Tanika Gupta: ‘A good play tells us something about the world we live in today’

Eugene Onegin – Festival Theatre, Edinburgh

Komische Oper Berlin presents Barrie Kosky’s radical staging of Tchaikovsky’s opera as part of the Edinburgh International Festival. It opens on August 15.

A scene from Eugene Onegin. Photo: Iko Freese Drama-Berlin.de
A scene from Eugene Onegin. Photo: Iko Freese Drama-Berlin.de

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