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Top 5 theatre shows to see this week (April 11-21)

Ria Zmitrowicz, Pearl Chanda and Patsy Ferran in rehearsals for Three Sisters. Photo: Marc Brenner Ria Zmitrowicz, Pearl Chanda and Patsy Ferran in rehearsals for Three Sisters. Photo: Marc Brenner
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Three Sisters – Almeida Theatre, London

Rebecca Frecknall follows her acclaimed, atmospheric take on Tennessee Williams’ Summer and Smoke with a production of Chekhov’s Three Sisters, adapted by Cordelia Lynn and once again starring the Olivier-winning Patsy Ferran, alongside Pearl Chanda and Ria Zmitrowicz. It opens on April 16.

Summer and Smoke star Patsy Ferran: ‘I enjoy being goofy, manly, ugly on stage, it’s liberating’

Sweeney Todd – Everyman Theatre, Liverpool

Liam Tobin and Kacey Ainsworth star as the Demon Barber and Mrs Lovett in Nick Bagnall’s new production of Sondheim’s macabre musical for the Liverpool Everyman. It opens on April 16.

Liam Tobin and Kacey Ainsworth. Photo: Gary Calton
Liam Tobin and Kacey Ainsworth. Photo: Gary Calton

Funeral Flowers – The Bunker, London

Chris Sonnex’s propulsive inaugural season as artistic director at the Bunker continues with Emma Dennis-Edwards’ play about trauma, opening on April 17.

Actor and writer Emma Dennis-Edwards: ‘Your value is not based on your work’

Amélie – Watermill Theatre, Newbury

In what sounds like a masterstroke of casting, Audrey Brisson plays the title role in the UK premiere of the musical based on the quirky French film. It opens on April 17.

Sweet Charity – Donmar Warehouse, London

Anne-Marie Duff stars as the hapless but hopeful Charity Hope Valentine in Josie Rourke’s final production as artistic director at the Donmar Warehouse. Arthur Darvill also stars in the show, which opens on April 17.

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