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Top 5 theatre shows to see this week (May 13-19)

Tim Preston in rehearsals for Lose Yourself. Photo: Mark Douet Tim Preston in rehearsals for Lose Yourself. Photo: Mark Douet
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Lose Yourself – Sherman Theatre, Cardiff

The new play by Katherine Chandler, the Sherman Theatre’s playwright in residence, is about one day told through three separate lenses. Tim Preston, Aaron Anthony and Gabrielle Creevy star. It opens on May 14.

Orpheus Descending – Menier Chocolate Factory, London

Tamara Harvey directs a revival of Tennessee Williams’ play based on the Orpheus myth. The co-production with the Menier Chocolate Factory and Theatr Clwyd opens in London on May 15.

Jemima Rooper and Seth Numrich in rehearsals for Orpheus Descending at the Menier Chocolate Factory. Photo: Johan Persson
Jemima Rooper and Seth Numrich in rehearsals for Orpheus Descending at the Menier Chocolate Factory. Photo: Johan Persson

Little Shop of Horrors – Storyhouse, Chester

Feed me, Seymour. Stephen Mear directs the cult musical about a very hungry plant. Michelle Bishop, plays Audrey. It opens in Chester on May 16.

Michelle Bishop in rehearsals for Little Shop of Horrors. Photo: Mark Carline
Michelle Bishop in rehearsals for Little Shop of Horrors. Photo: Mark Carline

White Pearl – Royal Court, London

The world premiere of Anchuli Felicia King’s play about race, social media and a video that goes viral opens on the Royal Court’s main stage on May 16.

Kae Alexander and Arty Froushan in rehearsal for White Pearl. Photo: Helen Murray
Kae Alexander and Arty Froushan in rehearsal for White Pearl. Photo: Helen Murray

Operation Mincemeat – New Diorama, London

Based on a true story, this collaboration between three members of comedy horror maestros Kill the Beast and the composer Felix Hagan, who call themselves Split Lip, opens at the New Diorama on May 17.

Split Lip

Chester Storyhouse’s Andrew Bentley and Alex Clifton: ‘The term ‘regional theatre’ is poisonous: every theatre’s a community theatre’

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