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Top 5 theatre shows to see this week (March 25-31)

Sophie Melville and Erin Doherty, who will star in Wolfie at Theatre503, London. Photo: Helen Murray Sophie Melville and Erin Doherty, who will star in Wolfie at Theatre503, London. Photo: Helen Murray
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Wolfie – Theatre503, London

Sophie Melville and Erin Doherty are actors who elevate everything they’re in. This bodes well for Lisa Spirling’s production of Ross Willis’ debut play, a fairytale about twins separated at birth. It opens on March 25.

Sophie Melville: ‘I was scared theatre would be posh and I wouldn’t understand it’

The Phlebotomist – Hampstead Theatre, London

Following a run at Hampstead’s Downstairs space in 2018, Ella Road’s debut play transfers to the Main Stage. Our reviewer called it a “clever dystopia with a human touch”. Jade Anouka stars in the production, which opens on March 25.

The Phlebotomist review at Hampstead Theatre Downstairs, London – ‘a clever dystopian drama

Skellig – Nottingham Playhouse

Nottingham Playhouse – winner of The Stage’s regional theatre of the year award – stages a version of David Almond’s Whitbread-winning children’s novel, directed by Lisa Blair. It opens on March 27.

Fiddler on the Roof – Playhouse Theatre, London

Trevor Nunn’s Menier Chocolate Factory production of the classic musical transfers to the West End, with Andy Nyman reprising his acclaimed performance in the role of Tevye. It opens on March 27.

Fiddler on the Roof review at Menier Chocolate Factory, London – ‘Trevor Nunn’s tight, trad revival

Grief is the Thing With Feathers – Barbican Theatre, London

Previously seen in Ireland, Enda Walsh’s adaptation of Max Porter’s delicate novel about the pain of bereavement stars Walsh’s regular collaborator Cillian Murphy and opens on March 28.

Grief is the Thing With Feathers review at O’Reilly Theatre, Dublin – ‘Cillian Murphy’s riveting performance’

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