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Top 5 theatre shows to see this week (February 25-March 3)

The cast in rehearsals for The Trick. Photo: Matt Maltby The cast in rehearsals for The Trick. Photo: Matt Maltby
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The Trick – Bush Theatre, London

Nine Night director Roy Alexander Weise helms an intriguing new play by Eve Leigh that interweaves themes of loss and magic. It opens on February 25.

Roy Alexander Weise: ‘I was looking for the loo but found a career in the theatre’

The Mirror Crack’d – Salisbury Playhouse

Melly Still directs the first ever UK stage version of one of Agatha Christie’s best Miss Marple mysteries. Rachel Wagstaff has adapted it and the touring production opens in Salisbury on February 25.

Susie Blake, who will play Miss Marple, in rehearsal for The Mirror Crack’d. Photo: Helen Murray
Susie Blake, who will play Miss Marple, in rehearsal for The Mirror Crack’d. Photo: Helen Murray

Dressed – Battersea Arts Centre, London

One of the critical successes of last year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe, This Egg’s show about trauma, body image, identity and clothing – mixing dance and music – opens at Battersea Arts Centre on February 26 ahead of a UK tour.

Dressed review at Underbelly Cowgate, Edinburgh – ‘as beautiful and visceral as raw silk’

The Remains of the Day – Royal and Derngate, Northampton

Another intriguing adaptation. Christopher Haydon directs Niamh Cusack in Barney Norris’ adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s poignant Booker prize-winning novel. It premieres on February 27 in Northampton, before a UK tour.

Niamh Cusack in rehearsals for The Remains of the Day. Photo: Iona Firouzabadi
Niamh Cusack in rehearsals for The Remains of the Day. Photo: Iona Firouzabadi

Wonderland – Northern Stage, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Adam Penford’s acclaimed Nottingham Playhouse production of Beth Steel’s mining drama – “powerful and pertinent” according to The Stage’s review – is at Northern Stage from February 27 until March 9.

Wonderland review at Nottingham Playhouse – ‘powerful and pertinent’

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