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Top 5 theatre shows to see this week (July 30-August 5)

Richard Harrington and Katherine Parkinson in Home, I'm Darling. Photo: Manuel Harlan Richard Harrington and Katherine Parkinson in Home, I'm Darling. Photo: Manuel Harlan
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Home, I’m Darling – National Theatre, London

Katherine Parkinson gives an immaculate performance in Laura Wade’s new five-star play about the pursuit of perfection in marriage and the roles people play. The Theatr Clwyd co-production opens on July 31.

Home, I’m Darling review at Theatr Clwyd – ‘Laura Wade’s superb new play’

The Act – Yard Theatre, London

Company Three, the company behind Brainstorm, brings its new show, designed to be performed by a cast of teenagers, back to the Yard. It runs from July 31 to August 2.

Brainstorm review at the National’s Temporary Theatre – ‘a theatrical MRI’

£¥$ (Lies) – Almeida Theatre, London

Belgian company Ontroerend Goed brings its immersive show, an “engaging, beautifully presented game of global capitalism in crisis”, previously seen at last year’s Edinburgh Fringe, to the Almeida Theatre. It opens on August 1.

£¥€$ (Lies) review at Summerhall, Edinburgh – ‘engaging and beautifully presented’

Othello – Shakespeare’s Globe, London

Former artistic director, now Oscar-winner, Mark Rylance returns to Shakespeare’s Globe to take on the role of Iago opposite Andre Holland’s Othello in a production directed by Claire van Kampen. Olivier-winning Sheila Atim plays Emilia and it opens on August 1.

Andre Holland in rehearsal for Othello. Photo: Simon Annand
Andre Holland in rehearsal for Othello. Photo: Simon Annand

Club Swizzle – Roundhouse, London

The fabulous Reuben Kaye heads up the new show from the creators of La Soiree at the Roundhouse. A fusion of cabaret, comedy, circus and live music, Club Swizzle opens on August 3.

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