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Nicky Morgan appointed culture secretary in Boris Johnson’s cabinet

Education secretary Nicky Morgan has been accused of failing to make arts education a priority. Photo: Ian Watts Culture secretary Nicky Morgan. Photo: Ian Watts
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Nicky Morgan has been appointed culture secretary by new prime minister Boris Johnson.

She replaces Jeremy Wright in the role, which he had held since July 2018.

Morgan, who is MP for Loughborough, said her appointment to the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport was “an enormous privilege” and described it as a “fabulous role”.

She said: “DCMS’s dynamic and much-loved sectors are at the heart of what makes the UK a great place to live, work and do business. They are our global calling card, encouraging investment, driving innovation and making the UK a country people around the world want to visit. I will be working hard to make sure the future for our world-leading sectors is a bright one.”

Morgan campaigned to remain in the European Union before the 2016 referendum and is a staunch opponent of leaving the EU without a deal, claiming that a no-deal scenario would “severely impact on the economy, employers and the finances of households”.

Her appointment comes just a day after a creative industries membership body wrote an open letter to Johnson, warning of the danger to the sector posed by a no-deal Brexit.

A former education secretary, Morgan came under fire from the arts sector in 2015 when she claimed that young people choosing to study creative subjects at school could “hold them back for the rest of their lives”, and argued that the subjects that “keep people’s options open and unlock doors to all sorts of careers are the STEM [science, technology, engineering and maths] subjects”.

Education secretary Nicky Morgan: ‘Arts subjects limit career choices’

She later claimed that she had wanted to encourage young people to study STEM subjects rather than discourage them from picking arts subjects.

This story was updated to include a fuller statement from Nicky Morgan.

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