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LAMDA student Stuart Thompson wins Sondheim performer of the year award

Stuart Thompson, winner of the 2019 Stephen Sondheim Society Student Performer of the Year award Stuart Thompson, winner of the 2019 Stephen Sondheim Society Student Performer of the Year award
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LAMDA student Stuart Thompson has won the 2019 Stephen Sondheim Society Student Performer of the Year award.

The prize recognises the best musical theatre student from a UK drama school.

Twelve finalists each performed a Stephen Sondheim song to compete for the prize at the gala event, hosted by Joanna Riding, at the Theatre Royal Haymarket on June 9.

Thompson performed Franklin Shepard, Inc from the musical Merrily We Roll Along.

Paige Fenlon from Bird College was selected as runner up, and Jamie Bogyo from RADA was awarded third place.

The student finalists also each performed a song written by entrants for the Stiles and Drewe Best New Song Prize. The entrants for this prize are members of Mercury Musical Developments, which works to improve new musical theatre writing.

Composer, lyricist and pianist Theo Jamieson won the Stiles and Drewe Prize for his original song Words/Amazing.

Ben Glasstone and Poppy Burton-Morgan were announced runners up for the Stiles and Drewe Prize for their song My Thing, which was also performed by Thompson.

The winners of both the Student Performer of the Year award and the Stiles and Drewe Best New Song Prize will receive £1,000.

Craig Glenday, chair of the Stephen Sondheim Society, today said: “Once again, the standard at this annual celebration of young and emerging talent was incredibly high, and I know the judges struggled to pick the winners.

“This gala has earned its status as one of the most important musical theatre events of the year, and the society is thrilled at the enthusiastic response from all those in attendance.”

Arts Ed student Alex Cardall wins Sondheim performer of the year award

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