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Disused 2,500-seat theatre in Eccles to be turned into flats

Crown Theatre in Eccles. Photo: Adam Slater Crown Theatre in Eccles. Photo: Adam Slater
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A disused 2,500-seat theatre in Salford is to be redeveloped into flats.

The grade II-listed Crown Theatre in Eccles, which was built in 1899 as the Lyceum Theatre, has not been used as a theatre since 1932.

Now it is to be redeveloped into about 80 flats by developer Foregate, with the facade of the building to be maintained.

The plans were approved by Salford City Council at a meeting earlier this month.

A spokesman for the Theatres Trust said it was “disappointed” that the foyer of the building has not been safeguarded for community use.

National planning advisor at the Theatres Trust Tom Clarke said: “It is always disappointing when a theatre building is lost.

“Unfortunately, the Crown had been allowed to deteriorate into a very poor condition, making it difficult to bring back into theatre use.

“In light of this, we welcome that the current scheme retains the facade and external fabric, providing some reminder for future generations of the tremendous history of this former theatre.”

Clarke added: “However, while there is potential for future community use within the former foyer, we are disappointed this wasn’t safeguarded and there was not a more thorough assessment of lack of need for the building in line with policy and our recommendation.”

In 2015, Foregate withdraw plans submitted to the council to demolish the entire building and replace it with flats after receiving objections from Theatres Trust and Historic England.

Crown Theatre in Eccles demolition plans put on hold

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