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Critics’ Awards for Theatre in Scotland 2019: the winners in full

Robert Jack, Darrell D'Silva and Lucianne McEvoy in Ulster American at Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh. Photo: Sid Scott Robert Jack, Darrell D'Silva and Lucianne McEvoy in Ulster American at Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh. The show was the big winner at the 2019 Critics’ Awards for Theatre in Scotland. Photo: Sid Scott
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The Critics’ Awards for Theatre in Scotland took place at the Tramway in Glasgow on June 9. Here are the winners in full:

Best female performance

Lucianne McEvoy, Ulster American at the Traverse Theatre Company

Ulster American review at Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh – ‘slickly structured, but crass and careless’

Best male performance

John Michie, The Mack – A Play, a Pie and a Pint at Òran Mór, presented in association with the Traverse Theatre

Best ensemble

Lost at Sea, Perth Theatre at Horsecross Arts and Morna Young

Lost at Sea review at Perth Theatre – ‘evocative, atmospheric, mesmerising’

Best director

Ian Brown, Lost at Sea

Best design

Shona Reppe (design concept), Ailsa Paterson (design realiser), Selene Cochrane (costume designer and maker) and Chris Edser (animator) for Baba Yaga, Imaginate and Windmill Theatre Company

Baba Yaga review at Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh – ‘inventive children’s theatre’

Best music and sound

Claire McKenzie (music and lyrics), Scott Gilmour (music and lyrics) and Richard Thomas (additional songs) for My Left/Right Foot – the Musical

My Left/Right Foot – The Musical review at Assembly Roxy, Edinburgh – ‘irreverent and entertaining’

Best technical presentation

The End of Eddy, Untitled Projects and the Unicorn Theatre

The End of Eddy review at the Studio, Edinburgh – ‘harrowing study of small-town homophobia’

Best production for children and young people

Stick by Me, Andy Manley, Ian Cameron, and Red Bridge Arts

Best new play

David Ireland for Ulster American

Best production

Ulster American

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