dfp_header_hidden_string

Get our free email newsletter with just one click

Bernadette Peters’ UK tour cancelled by producer with history of collapsed shows

Bernadette Peters
by -

Bernadette Peters’ UK tour has been cancelled, with producer Speckulation admitting it had been unable to fulfil its “contractual obligations”.

The cancellation of the tour is the latest in a string of collapsed shows produced by Neil Eckersley.

In 2012, a tour starring Kristin Chenoweth, produced by Eckersley’s Speckulation, was cancelled. This was blamed on “unforeseen circumstances”.

In 2017, a tour of Wonderland was cancelled, leaving suppliers and crew owed thousands.

Wonderland was produced by Wonderland the Musical Ltd, run by Eckersley.

In 2014, the cast and crew of Momentous Musicals, produced by Eckersley, also claimed to be owed thousands.

Cast and crew members claim musicals producer owes them thousands

Peters had been due to tour to venues including the Lyceum in London on June 10, the Milton Keynes Theatre on June 18 and Birmingham’s Symphony Hall on June 14.

In a statement, Speckulation said: “We regret to announce that we are unable to present our planned UK tour with multi award-winning actress Bernadette Peters, as a result of Speckulation Entertainment Ltd’s unforeseen inability to fulfil our contractual obligation.”

It added: “We apologise for any inconvenience that this may cause. Online bookings will be refunded automatically. Patrons who booked via other methods should contact their point of purchase for a full refund.”

Writing on social media, Peters said she was disappointed not to be coming to the UK.

According to Companies House, the production company was facing being struck off the register and dissolved, with assets of the company then belonging to the Crown.

However, this action has since been discontinued because “cause has been shown why the above company should not be struck off the register”.

Although audiece members have been told they will get refunds for tickets, many have said they will lose money on hotels and travel.

We need your help…

When you subscribe to The Stage, you’re investing in our journalism. And our journalism is invested in supporting theatre and the performing arts.

The Stage is a family business, operated by the same family since we were founded in 1880. We do not receive government funding. We are not owned by a large corporation. Our editorial is not dictated by ticket sales.

We are fully independent, but this means we rely on revenue from readers to survive.

Help us continue to report on great work across the UK, champion new talent and keep up our investigative journalism that holds the powerful to account. Your subscription helps ensure our journalism can continue.

loading...
^