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Music Theatre Wales teams with London Sinfonietta to create new touring operas

Jennifer France in Pascal Dusapin's Passion, one of the first shows the two companies will collaborate on. Photo: Simon Banham Jennifer France in Pascal Dusapin's Passion, one of the first shows the two companies will collaborate on. Photo: Simon Banham
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Welsh opera company Music Theatre Wales has partnered with the London Sinfonietta to collaborate on touring productions.

Cardiff-based Music Theatre Wales said it hoped to establish “a powerhouse for music theatre and new opera”, and promised to feature a diverse range of artists and creatives.

The two companies will work together on a new development scheme called New Directions. It is intended to re-imagine the kind of work each company creates and promote different ways of working.

New Directions will launch next year.

As part of the association, the London Sinfonietta will perform in all MTW productions and will contribute to the selection process for repertoire and conductors.

The two companies have already announced several productions that will be staged during the first three years of the collaboration. These include a new opera by Tom Coult and Alice Birch, and Denis and Katya by Philip Venables and Ted Huffman, both of which will run in 2020.

MTW artistic director Michael McCarthy said: “Working with the London Sinfonietta is a huge privilege and represents a moment of significant change for MTW. I look forward to hearing this exceptional group of musicians bring our future productions to life.

“Equally, we look forward to introducing inspiring new work to ever wider audiences across Wales and England and hopefully internationally as we take these productions on tour.”

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