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Candoco to be first contemporary dance company to perform on BBC1’s Strictly Come Dancing

Members of Candoco Dance Company rehearsing for their appearance on BBC1's Strictly Come Dancing
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Candoco is to become the first contemporary dance company to appear on the BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing.

Candoco Dance Company, which is made up of disabled and non-disabled dancers, will perform a piece choreographed by former Strictly judge Arlene Phillips.

Blending Candoco’s contemporary dance style with ballroom and Latin styles, the piece is set to David Bowie’s Life on Mars.

The number will be performed by Candoco alongside Strictly’s professional dancers on the results show on November 25.

Phillips said: “When I was asked by Candoco if I would be interested in working with the company on a project linking them together with some of the series-regular professionals in a unique piece, I was instantly intrigued.

“Admiring the Candoco artists and BBC pros as I do, I quickly said yes, but soon realised it was going to be quite a complex undertaking.”

Cast members performing the piece from Candoco include Megan Armishaw, Joel Brown, Mickaella Dantas, Olivia Edginton, Fabian Jackson, Welly O’Brien, Laura Patay, Kuldip Singh-Barmi, Toke Broni Strandby and Nicholas Vendage.

The performance follows an episode of Strictly Come Dancing on November 17, in which former England cricketer Graeme Swann and his Strictly partner Oti Mabuse performed to choreography by Olivier award-winner Bill Deamer.

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