dfp_header_hidden_string

Get our free email newsletter with just one click

Guidelines launched to help arts organisations adapt to older audiences

The new age-friendly standards provide specific guidance on welcoming older people. Photo: Ros Chesher The new age-friendly standards provide specific guidance on welcoming older people. Photo: Ros Chesher
by -

The Family Arts Campaign has launched new guidance to help cultural organisations better suit the needs of older audiences.

The scheme has been developed in response to reports of a significant drop-off in cultural engagement later in life, due to an increasing number of barriers.

The new age-friendly standards provide specific guidance on welcoming older people, with participating organisations displaying a logo that marks it as having considered the more complex needs of older visitors.

Five key areas are addressed, including suitable programming, building relationships with older audiences, having appropriate facilities, suitable communication and providing a warm welcome.

The new age-friendly standards have been developed in consultation with leading experts including charity Age UK and 170 cultural organisations, as well as audiences.

The Family Arts Campaign said the standards support Arts Council England’s Celebrating Age fund, launched to help cultural spaces be open and welcoming to older people.

They will run alongside the campaign’s existing family arts standards, which denote good practice in welcoming families and are used by more than 500 organisations.

Jenny Daly, head of the Family Arts Campaign, said: “Older people are an important part of the family, with multiple generations living side by side.

“Arts and culture contribute significantly to a positive experience of later life, as well as providing a means to connect young and old. The age-friendly standards signify an important shift for the Family Arts Campaign in supporting the cultural sector to facilitate these experiences.”

We need your help…

When you subscribe to The Stage, you’re investing in our journalism. And our journalism is invested in supporting theatre and the performing arts.

The Stage is a family business, operated by the same family since we were founded in 1880. We do not receive government funding. We are not owned by a large corporation. Our editorial is not dictated by ticket sales.

We are fully independent, but this means we rely on revenue from readers to survive.

Help us continue to report on great work across the UK, champion new talent and keep up our investigative journalism that holds the powerful to account. Your subscription helps ensure our journalism can continue.

loading...
^