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Theatre N16 signs up for Equity’s low pay/no pay agreement

Theatre N16 is moving to a space above The Bedford pub in Balham. Photo: Ewan Munro/Flickr Theatre N16 has signed up to Equity's low pay/no pay agreement. Photo: Ewan Munro/Flickr
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Fringe venue Theatre N16 has become the latest arts organisation to sign up to Equity’s low pay/no pay agreement.

It means that the theatre in south London will guarantee performers appearing there at least the minimum wage.

Theatre N16 becomes the seventh venue to agree to use the contract since it was launched just over a year ago, and adds to what Equity has called a “new wave of fringe theatre creators” who are working towards “something artistically and ethically positive”.

Equity low pay/no pay organiser Emmanuel de Lange said: “They are the latest to sign up and we are thrilled, as they are a relatively new venue and have big ambitions. They have an exciting programme coming up and they are very committed to fair pay.”

De Lange added that seven venues using the agreement was a “positive start” to the campaign.
“Each venues comes into contact with so many production companies and it has an enormously important impact,” he said, adding: “It feels like [we are working with] a group of people, who are often young, and have exciting ideas about how fringe theatre should be progressing.”

Jamie Eastlake, artistic director at Theatre N16, which was launched last year, said the venue had already been paying its staff minimum wage.

The deal with Equity means it will now ensure every company visiting the theatre also pays its actors at least the minimum wage.

He told The Stage: “We are in the right place to do this and want to make a bit of a statement. I think we’ve worked from day one to make sure we can do this, and it’s the only way of making the fringe viable.”

Eastlake added that other venues should take up the agreement and “think outside the box”.

“Start finding every available outlet to raise funds. That is our approach. We rent the bit of the building we are in, but have now started sub-letting some of it to increase our revenue to enable us to do this,” he said.

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