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Lloyd Webber Foundation pledges £15k to young musicians

The Mayor's Music Fund awards scholarships to London primary school children from under-privileged backgrounds. Photo: Paul J Cochrane The Mayor's Music Fund awards scholarships to London primary school children from under-privileged backgrounds. Photo: Paul J Cochrane
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Andrew Lloyd Webber has pledged £15,000 through his foundation to help young musicians from disadvantaged backgrounds in London.

The money will support two years of music scholarships for eight primary school pupils in London, as part of the Mayor’s Music Fund scholarship scheme.

An additional £500 will go towards ongoing funding for young musician Charlie Browne, who has previously taken part in the scholarship scheme.

Foundation trustee Madeleine Lloyd Webber said the funding would offer its recipients “high-quality tuition and inspirational musical opportunities”.

“This is the heart of our mission, and I a delighted to announce support for a further two years of scholarships under their banner,” she added.

The Mayor’s Music Fund has been in existence since 2011, awarding more than 375 scholarships to primary school children from under-privileged backgrounds across London.

Mayor’s Music Fund chief executive Chrissy Kinsella said: “I am enormously grateful to the Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation for its ongoing commitment to and belief in our work. This generous support means eight more talented young musicians from low-income families will receive opportunities they wouldn’t otherwise have access to.”

The new grants follow the announcement of a £1.4 million boost to a scheme to give free music lessons to school children. The foundation’s grant, announced earlier this month, secures the future of the Music in Secondary Schools Trust Andrew Lloyd Webber Programme for a further four years.

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