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Edward Watson and Lauren Cuthbertson bronzes to be unveiled at Royal Ballet exhibition

The Royal Ballet Collection is a collaboration between the ballet company and British artist Michael James Talbot The Royal Ballet Collection is a collaboration between the ballet company and British artist Michael James Talbot
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Royal Ballet dancers Edward Watson and Lauren Cuthbertson are being immortalised in bronze sculptures as part of a new collection inspired by dance at the Royal Opera House.

The Royal Ballet Collection is a collaboration between the ballet company and British artist Michael James Talbot, and the first four pieces of the series will be unveiled next week.

Three of the bronze sculptures, one of which is a portrait of Watson, have already been completed, while a fourth, on which Talbot is working with Cuthbertson, is currently being created.

Another of the sculptures has been created in honour of former associate director of the Royal Ballet, Jeanetta Laurence.

Talbot, whose work specialises in the human form, described the project as the beginning of a dialogue between sculpture and dance.

“Sculpture is drawn to ballet like a moth to a flame, the Royal Ballet being its brightest flame. To stand in a rehearsal room in the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, is to see the sinew and bones of the ballet literally and metaphorically,” he added.

The sculptures, along with a series of drawings and watercolours created during the process, will be sold to support the Royal Ballet.

Royal Ballet director Kevin O’Hare said: “Michael has captured the beauty of the body in these drawings and sculptures and it’s been fascinating to see them at various stages in development.”

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