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£1m Teacher Development Fund to boost arts education in primary schools

The fund has been created in response to evidence that points to a lack of specialist knowledge among primary school teachers The fund has been created in response to evidence that points to a lack of specialist knowledge among primary school teachers. Photo: Syda Productions / Shutterstock
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A new £1 million fund to boost arts education in primary schools has been launched by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

The Teacher Development Fund has been created in response to evidence that points to a lack of specialist knowledge among primary school teachers, and follows calls for arts to be prioritised more in education.

More than 70 schools will take part in the scheme, which will focus on providing support for teachers serving disadvantaged communities, where it is difficult to attract and retain teachers.

A consortium of arts organisations across the country will partner with schools on the project, with involvement from the British Council, Creative Scotland and the Royal Society of Arts, as well as the Royal Shakespeare Company, and arts and education specialists ArtsConnect.

PHF chief executive Moira Sinclair said the fund had been launched to help teaching professionals reach their potential.

She said: “We believe that the arts have an important role to play in enriching young people’s learning and educational experiences and in improving their life chances. Research has shown that teachers sometimes lack the knowledge, confidence and skills to deliver effective earning in and through the arts.”

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