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Sutton Theatres to launch new 120-seat venue

What the Day Owes to the Night will feature in the first season for the three venues. Photo: Ahmad Daghlas What the Day Owes to the Night will feature in the first season for the three venues. Photo: Ahmad Daghlas
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A new 120-seat performance space with a focus on original work, cabaret and music will open as part of the relaunched Secombe Theatre in south London.

The venue, called Back Door @ The Secombe, will focus on informal entertainment and will run alongside the 396-seat Secombe and studio space the Cryer.

Both the Secombe and Cryer were saved by private company the Sutton Theatres Trust earlier this year after a period of uncertainty. Sutton Council – which previously owned the venues – threatened to close them in a bid to save £40 million across its services. All three spaces will now be collectively known as Sutton Theatres.

Under the joint directorship of Beri Juraic and Micha Colombo – founders of the Sutton Theatres Trust – the first season of work for the three venues includes a new short opera, inspired by the First World War.

Called The Lost Field of Summer, it will have music by Laura Bowler, a libretto by Alasdair Middleton and will be directed by Psyche Stott. It will run from October 14 to 31 at the Secombe.

The programme also includes a new festival of north African dance and theatre, Marhaba Maghreb, across both venues. The festival will feature the UK premiere of Tunisian theatre maker Meher Awachri’s Plastic and What the Day Owes to the Night by choreographer Cie Herve Koubi, which has previously been performed at the Bolshoi Ballet and in New York. The festival will take place from November 21 to 29.

The season also includes the world premieres of Ciaran McConville’s Stones and 2:1, a collaboration between Kansaze Dance Theatre and playwright Emma Dennis-Edwards.

Comedy acts such as Jason Byrne, Tim Vine, Rich Hall and Katherine Ryan will also perform at Sutton Theatres as part of the programme.

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