Edinburgh fringe productions to be broadcast live to Odeon cinemas

Steven Berkoff's one-man Edinburgh show will be broadcast live to cinemas.
Steven Berkoff's one-man Edinburgh show will be broadcast live to cinemas.
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Productions from the Edinburgh fringe – including a one-man show from Steven Berkoff – are to be broadcast live to Odeon cinemas.

The cinema chain has teamed up with online arts service Hibrow to bring live performances from the festival to cinemagoers in August.

Hibrow launched in 2012 as an online video-on-demand site that brings plays, dance productions and concerts to users.

At this year’s Edinburgh Festival Fringe the company will produce Hibrow Hour, a series of daily performances at the Summerhall venue.

From these, eight performances will be broadcast live to cinemas around the UK.

Don Boyd, Hibrow artistic director, explained that the Summerhall season was conceived with the intention of “offering audiences everywhere a flavour of Edinburgh’s creative buzz in August”.

“Our relationship with Odeon has given us the opportunity to fulfil that ambition and so extend the great work pioneered by the National Theatre and the Royal Opera House in bringing exciting new shows to local cinemas all over the country,” he said.

The first screening from Hibrow Hour will be The Dispute, on August 4, which is a reimagining of Marivaux’s comedy La Dispute, directed by Emily Kempson.

This will be followed by The Hibrow Comedy Hour, a show featuring Jonny and the Baptists, on August 6.

The Man Who Almost Killed Himself, an adaptation of writings by anthropologist Andrew Irving, will be screened on August 11, with more comedy following on August 12 as sketch group Four Screws Loose perform.

Berkoff’s one-man show, Berkoff the Inimitable, will be broadcast to cinemas on August 14, followed by Sleight and Hand, a play by Chris Bush, directed by Marieke Audsley.

A further Hibrow Comedy Hour will be shown on August 20, with the live screenings coming to a close on August 21 with an “operatic satire” from Alison Jackson, called A Story in the Public Domain.

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