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1,000-seat theatre to be built in Kings Cross for The Railway Children

The Railway Children at the Waterloo Station Theatre in 2010. Photo: Tristram Kenton
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A purpose built 1,000-seat theatre will be constructed behind King’s Cross station in London – as the new home for York Theatre Royal’s production of The Railway Children.

The pop-up theatre in King’s Boulevard will incorporate railway tracks and platforms, with the production involving a live 60-tonne steam locomotive and carriage.

The show – adapted for the stage from E Nesbitt’s novel by Mike Kenny – originally opened in the National Railway Museum in York in 2008, before transferring to a specially designed space in Waterloo station in 2010.

Following the move to London, the show went on to win the Olivier award for best entertainment in 2011.

Liz Wilson, the chief executive of York Theatre Royal, said of the production: “Part of The Railway Children’s popularity is its ability to appeal to a wide audience, as previous sell–out runs in York, Waterloo and Toronto have proved.

“York Theatre Royal and the National Railway Museum are delighted to be bringing the production to this wonderful new location in London.”

The Railway Children previews from 16 December, with a press night on 14 January. The production is currently booking until March 1, 2015.

Damian Cruden is directing, with design by Jo Scotcher, lighting by Richard G. Jones, music by Christopher Madin and sound by Craig Vear.

Casting is yet to be announced.

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