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Musical of The Remains of The Day to premiere at London’s Union Theatre

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London dates have been confirmed for the premiere of a musical adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s Booker Prize-winning novel The Remains of the Day.

The show will play from August 31 to September 25 at the Union Theatre in Southwark.

As revealed by The Stage last June, the production is written by Alex and Chris Loveless, who in 2008 premiered a new musical version of Dracula at the White Bear Theatre in south London.

While the novel has previously been adapted for a 1993 film starring Anthony Hopkins and a BBC radio play with Ian McDiarmid in the main part, this will mark its stage debut.

At the time, Ishiguro told The Stage: “I’ve thought for some years now the story might adapt well to the stage. We had some interest in a stage version after the movie came out in 1993, but the stage rights were tied up with the film studio at that time.

“Just in the last couple of years, my agent and I had been talking about the possibility of a stage adaptation and she had put out some feelers.”

He added: “I must admit the idea of it being a musical was at first a rather challenging one. But as Sondheim has proved, it is possible to combine searching drama with music to tremendous effect, so I thought, why not let these guys run with it? I listened to Alex Loveless play some musical ideas on a piano and that convinced me it could work.

“Adapting this story as a musical, I could see, might have the advantage of highlighting its comedic and surreal aspects. It’s an adventurous approach and I’m keen to support it.”

The musical will feature a cast of nine, with four musicians, and includes 17 musical numbers. It is being produced by Simon James Collier in association with Fallen Angel Theatre Company and Poppy Ben-David.

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