dfp_header_hidden_string

In The Stage newspaper this week: September 7

Philip Quast with Peter Forbes in Follies. Photo: Tristram Kenton
Philip Quast with Peter Forbes in Follies at the National Theatre. Photo: Tristram Kenton
by -

The Stage newspaper comes out once a week and is brimming with industry news, advice, analysis and reviews from all over the UK. Here are some of the highlights from the September 7 issue...

The Big Interview: Philip Quast

The only man to win the best actor in a musical Olivier three times, Philip Quast still felt it was necessary to fly from Australia to audition for Follies, rather than send in the requested tape. He tells Mark Shenton about the ghosts the National Theatre houses and why this might be his final appearance in the UK.

Recent reporting on diversity is bad, but the reality is even worse

Coveted role: Paapa Essiedu in the Royal Shakespeare Company’s production of Hamlet. Photo: Tristram Kenton
Coveted role: Paapa Essiedu in the Royal Shakespeare Company’s production of Hamlet. Photo: Tristram Kenton

To get a true picture of diversity in the live and recorded arts, it is crucial that future studies strive to uncover the types of jobs people are doing – not simply note that they are being employed, Jami Rogers argues.

Jermyn Street artistic director Tom Littler: ‘It’s hard to work in small spaces – you can’t cheat’

After a career as a freelance director and producer, Jermyn Street Theatre’s new artistic director tells Nick Smurthwaite why he couldn’t be more excited about the prospect of running the central London venue.

Nassim Soleimanpour: ‘Refusing military service in 
Iran doesn’t make me a hero’

Nassim Soleimanpour. Photo: Nima Soleimanpour
Nassim Soleimanpour. Photo: Nima Soleimanpour

The Fringe First-winning playwright’s works have travelled the world while he was unable to leave his native country. Now he’s performing his latest play himself – with a little help from the audience, he tells Thom Dibdin.

How Czech theatre is going global while staying intimate

Wind-Up, part of the Czech showcase at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2017. Photo: Maciej Zakrzewski
Wind-Up, part of the Czech showcase at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2017. Photo: Maciej Zakrzewski

In 1970s Czechoslovakia, it was illegal to hold public cultural events, so artists began performing in their living rooms. Now that model is being brought to London by the Czech Centre. Eleanor Turney finds out more.

How pop-up venues are rewriting theatre’s rules

Artist’s impression of the new Marble Arch Theatre, hosting Five Guys Named Moe. Photo: Imaginar
Artist’s impression of the new Marble Arch Theatre, hosting Five Guys Named Moe. Photo: Imaginar

When is a theatre not a theatre? When it’s a New Orleans jazz bar or pulls in punters on the beach. Holly Williams speaks to producers Underbelly and HighTide as they lay the groundwork for venues that reflect how theatre spaces are changing.

Zigger Zagger! Oi! Oi! Oi! How football’s first musical kicked off

A scene from National Youth Theatre's original 1967 production of Zigger Zagger. Photo: John Haynes
A scene from National Youth Theatre's original 1967 production of Zigger Zagger. Photo: John Haynes

The National Youth Theatre’s revival of Peter Terson’s 1960s terraces-set musical marks its 50th anniversary. Nick Smurthwaite looks back at the birth of the boisterous ‘football opera’, the NYT’s first ever new-writing commission.

Plus more opinion, advice and interviews...

Mark Shenton To review Hamlet, or not to review...
Lyn Gardner Free tickets are not a critic's right
Stephanie Street We're at our best working as a collective
Milly Thomas I was scared to write about suicide, but it was worth it
The Green Room Have you ever worked abroad?
West End Producer What to do if an actor can't do he job?
Careers Clinic How do I move from dancing to acting?
Shabnam Shabazi 'As a refugee, I had a lot of stories'
Farooq Beg 'I tell my team they are creating history'

loading...
^