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The Stage Podcast: Mark Thomas Q&A

Mark Thomas is presented with The Stage Special Award by reviews editor Natasha Tripney. Photo: Alex Brenner Mark Thomas is presented with The Stage Special Award by reviews editor Natasha Tripney. Photo: Alex Brenner
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The Stage Podcast: Mark Thomas, interviewed by Thom Dibdin

As he collects The Stage Special Award, part of The Stage Edinburgh Awards 2016, Mark Thomas talks to Thom Dibdin about discovering Brecht, the difference between comedy and theatre, how he deals with phones in the auditorium and his show at the Traverse Theatre, The Red Shed.


The Stage Podcast, Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2016, part 6

In our sixth Edinburgh episode, we catch up with Sarah-Louise Young, who is juggling three shows at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. How does she do it? “My day is boringly military.” The cabaret performer – who is appearing in Cabaret Whore Presents… La Poule Plombee, Roulston and Young: Songs for Lovers (and Other Idiots) and Royal Vauxhall, as well as guest spots throughout the month – also discusses tips to preserve your voice and talks about the difference between Edinburgh and London audiences.

Meanwhile, on the critics’ sofa, Tim Bano has caught up with Henry Naylor’s Angel, while Paul Vale has been to see Buzz – A New Musical, a new musical about vibrators…

See more from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and Edinburgh International Festival

If you’d like to listen to The Stage Podcast on your iPhone or iPad, open the Podcasts app and search for ‘The Stage’. If you are using an Android device, you will need to download a podcasting app from Google Play. We recommend Pocket Casts (£2.49).

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The Stage Podcast, Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2016, part 5

In our fifth Edinburgh-specific podcast episode, Mark Thomas talks about his show The Red Shed at the Traverse Theatre, and how his work has increasingly moved from stand-up towards theatre in a bid to reflect the truth. He also talks about performance, journalism, audience participation and why he nearly voted Leave in the EU referendum.

Meanwhile, our critics pick some of their top shows. This week things take an immersive turn as Tim Bano and Paul Vale discuss the relative merits of an immersive musical, an immersive dance piece and one of Edinburgh’s most talked-about immersive theatre shows, Counting Sheep.

See more from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and Edinburgh International Festival

If you’d like to listen to The Stage Podcast on your iPhone or iPad, open the Podcasts app and search for ‘The Stage’. If you are using an Android device, you will need to download a podcasting app from Google Play. We recommend Pocket Casts (£2.49).

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The Stage Podcast, Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2016, part 4

In episode four of The Stage Podcast’s Edinburgh 2016 series, we catch up with Abbi Greenland and Helen Goalen, aka RashDash. The company has returned to the Edinburgh Festival Fringe for the first time in four years with Two Man Show. In this podcast, they discuss gender, feminism, men and masculinity, plus the practical benefits of getting naked on stage.

Tim Bano and Paul Vale are perched on the critics’ sofa this week. Their recommendations include Foiled, a site-specific play set in a hairdresser, and On the Conditions and Possibilities of Hillary Clinton Taking Me As Her Young Lover.

There’s also discussion of musicals that are ripe for improvement, and why composers and lyricists should treat the fringe as an opportunity to window shop for writing partners.

Next week Mark Thomas talks about his Traverse show, The Red Shed.

See more from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and Edinburgh International Festival

If you’d like to listen to The Stage Podcast on your iPhone or iPad, open the Podcasts app and search for ‘The Stage’. If you are using an Android device, you will need to download a podcasting app from Google Play. We recommend Pocket Casts (£2.49).

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The Stage Podcast, Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2016, part 3

As we hit the mid-point of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Glasgow-based theatremaker Kieran Hurley talks about storytelling, sound design and the apocalypse.

Plus Stewart Pringle takes to the critics’ sofa to discuss his picks of the fringe. Daniel Kitson, Breach Theatre and Forest Fringe are all on his radar.

Tim Bano presents.

See more from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and Edinburgh International Festival

If you’d like to listen to The Stage Podcast on your iPhone or iPad, open the Podcasts app and search for ‘The Stage’. If you are using an Android device, you will need to download a podcasting app from Google Play. We recommend Pocket Casts (£2.49).

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The Stage Podcast, Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2016, part 2

In the second episode from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, New Zealander Tim Carlsen talks about his Edinburgh show, One Day Moko, and about the challenges of bringing a piece of theatre from the other side of the world to a new city for the first time. The answer? Three large suitcases, Skyping the director, government grants and crowdfunding, apparently.

Plus Tim Bano and Stewart Pringle talk about which shows they’re looking forward to in Edinburgh, both at the International and Fringe festivals, and how to choose what to see and when.

See more from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and Edinburgh International Festival

If you’d like to listen to The Stage Podcast on your iPhone or iPad, open the Podcasts app and search for ‘The Stage’. If you are using an Android device, you will need to download a podcasting app from Google Play. We recommend Pocket Casts (£2.49).

Once you’ve found the podcast, you can subscribe to receive updates directly to your phone or tablet.

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The Stage Podcast, Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2016, part 1

The Stage Podcast is back for the Edinburgh festival 2016. Tim Bano hosts a series of six shows interviewing theatremakers and critics at the world’s biggest trade show for theatre.

In this episode, Tim talks to Kill the Beast about its new show, Don’t Wake the Damp, which Stewart Pringle has called the company’s best work in his review for The Stage. Stewart also joins Tim on the critic’s sofa for a rundown of the brightest prospects at this year’s festivals.

See more from the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and Edinburgh International Festival

If you’d like to listen to The Stage Podcast on your iPhone or iPad, open the Podcasts app and search for ‘The Stage’. If you are using an Android device, you will need to download a podcasting app from Google Play. We recommend Pocket Casts (£2.49).

Once you’ve found the podcast, you can subscribe to receive updates directly to your phone or tablet.

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The Stage Podcast: Episode 3 (Brighton festivals, part three)

In Episode 3 of The Stage Podcast we’re back in Brighton and talking to Matt Adams (Blast Theory) and Jem Wall (Hydrocracker) about making Operation Black Antler, the controversial immersive theatre piece in which audience members ‘became’ undercover police for the duration.

Also, Tim Crouch speaks to Orla Flanagan about reviving Adler and Gibb in Edinburgh later this year and his plans for the future.

Plus Tracey Sinclair and Tom Wicker join Tim Bano on the critics’ sofa, where highlights include The Marlowe Papers (“a conspiracy theorist’s dream”), And the Rope Still Tugging Her Feet (“for a piece about dead babies, it was actually quite funny”) and Correction (“found humour in the minutiae of exploring how far you can get by pushing one person and watching someone else at the end of the line fall over”).

See more from the Brighton Fringe

If you’d like to listen to The Stage Podcast on your iPhone or iPad, open the Podcasts app and search for ‘The Stage’. If you are using an Android device, you will need to download a podcasting app from Google Play. We recommend Pocket Casts (£2.49).

Once you’ve found the podcast, you can subscribe to receive updates directly to your phone or tablet.

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The Stage Podcast: Episode 2 (Brighton festivals, part two)

In Episode 2 of The Stage Podcast, Tim Bano talks to Brighton Fringe managing director Julian Caddy and we hear from Tim Crouch, director of Spymonkey’s Complete Deaths, talking to Brighton Dome theatre producer Orla Flanagan.

Tim is joined on the critics’ sofa by Tracey Sinclair and Tom Wicker, who discuss their Brighton show highlights.

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The Stage Podcast: Episode 1 (Brighton festivals, part one)

In Episode 1 of The Stage podcast, Tim Bano and Tom Wicker get to grips with the Brighton Fringe and Brighton Festival – what’s good, what’s different and what to look forward to.

Tim also talks to Vicky Featherstone, artistic director of the Royal Court, about her production of Our Ladies of Perpetual Succour, her tenure at the famous London venue and her plans for the future.

See more from the Brighton Fringe

Ira Brand and Catherine Ireton discuss the similarities and differences between their shows – Break Yourself and Leaving Home Party – at the Brighton Fringe, while Lucy Grace and Dan Hutton discuss their Brighton Fringe show, Garden.

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A planned second episode will see Tim and Tom back in the studio, joined by Tracey Sinclair, looking back at some of the hits and misses of the Brighton festivals to date. The podcast team will also be meeting the Brighton Fringe’s managing director, Julian Caddy, and Brighton Dome theatre producer Orla Flanagan. Plus, director Tim Crouch talks about putting together Spymonkey’s Complete Deaths (a show including twisted versions of all 74 of Shakespeare’s death scenes) and Tim catches up with Blast Theory and Hydrocracker about their immersive political work, Operation Black Antler.

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