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In The Stage newspaper this week: September 15

Sarah Frankcom (right) accepting The Stage’s Regional Theatre of the Year award for the Royal Exchange earlier this year with the venue’s former executive director Fiona Gasper. Photo: Alex Brenner
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The Stage newspaper comes out once a week and is brimming with industry news, advice, analysis and reviews from all over the UK. Here are some of the highlights from the September 15 issue.

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The Big Interview: Sarah Frankcom

As Manchester’s Royal Exchange celebrates its 40th anniversary, its artistic director since 2008 talks to Mark Shenton about her plans to change the profile and reach of the venue, why the relationship with the local audience is so central to her work and why a safe approach can never be an option for her.

London stats tell a broader story

In our recent Insight article, David Brownlee pointed to stark arts-funding differences within the capital. But data expert Joe Shellard says central London’s ‘halo effect’ means there’s more to the figures than meets the eye.

Thomas Hescott: More open auditions will hit the refresh button for talent

Vivienne Gibbs (centre) won her part in Jumpers for Goalposts (a Paines Plough co-production with West yorkshire Playhouse and Hull Truck Theatre), which toured in 2013, via an open audition. Photo:  Elyse Marks
Vivienne Gibbs (centre) won her part in Jumpers for Goalposts (a Paines Plough co-production with Watford Palace and Hull Truck), which toured in 2013, via an open audition. Photo: Elyse Marks

Open auditions are commonplace in musical theatre to unearth stars struggling to break through by traditional routes. Thomas Hescott suggests straight plays follow suit in order to diversify the pool of actors for stage and screen.

The Stage Scholarships past winners

Where are they now? We meet some of the recipients of past scholarships and find out if their training has led them to success on the stage.

Nick Salmon: ‘General management allows us to produce only when we want to’

Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart in No Man’s Land, produced by Playful and now arriving in the West End after a UK tour. Photo: Johan Persson
Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart in No Man’s Land, Photo: Johan Persson

Producer Nick Salmon of Playful Productions is enjoying a run of hits with shows including The Audience and No Man’s Land. He tells Mark Shenton why he finds the high-stakes nature of the business so compulsive.

International: The rise of cultural hubs in Asia

Tipped to be one of the world’s major arts hubs, the West Kowloon Cultural District will be home to 17 arts venues. Nick Awde finds out what has inspired the boom in cultural investment in Asia.

Backstage: This most excellent canopy

 A scene from The Wawel Dragon at The Scoop. Photo: Sheila Burnett
A scene from The Wawel Dragon at The Scoop. Photo: Sheila Burnett

As another theatre season gets under way at More London’s the Scoop, Neil Norman finds out about the technical challenges of mounting an open-air production.

The Theatres Trust: a 40-year rescue mission

Four decades ago, the organisation took on the role of protecting some of our most highly valued venues. Nick Smurthwaite looks back at its achievements.

Page-1-for-web-091516Plus…

Stephanie Street How an inspiring young cast banished the blues
Paul Clayton ‘Dianna Rigg rendered me speechless’
Kieran Knowles ‘New York audiences were a culture shock’
The Green Room What plays and playwrights inspire you?
The Stage Scholarships Barbara Speake Stage School winner
Careers Clinic Will a theatre role ruin my screen future?
West End Producer ‘They need to rename it Staged School, dear’

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