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In The Stage newspaper this week: August 18

Tim Minchin (music, lyrics) (right), with Danny Rubin (book) in rehearsal for Groundhog Day. Photo: Manuel Harlan Tim Minchin (music, lyrics) (right), with Danny Rubin (book) in rehearsal for Groundhog Day. Photo: Manuel Harlan
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The Stage newspaper comes out once a week and is brimming with industry news, advice, analysis and reviews from all over the UK. Here are some of the highlights from the August 18 issue which features more opinion, stories and reviews from the Edinburgh festivals as well as our usual news and reviews. Find out where to buy your copy here.

The Big Interview: Tim Minchin

Musician, actor, comedian, writer – the award-winning Tim Minchin wears many hats. He tells Mark Shenton he is proud of his diverse career and the fact he has written two musicals, the smash hit Matilda and now a stage adaptation of the film Groundhog Day, which just opened at the Old Vic and is heading for Broadway next year.

Our obsession with theatre etiquette is rooted in the past

At Shakespeare’s Globe audiences can experience what it might have been like to be a groundling at an Elizabethan theatre. Photo: Helen Miscioscia
At Shakespeare’s Globe audiences can experience what it might have been like to be a groundling at an Elizabethan theatre. Photo: Helen Miscioscia

After complaints about talking, eating and a lack of respect for fellow theatregoers, audience behaviour has become a hot topic. Kirsty Sedgman examines the historical context to see what modern audiences can learn.

Andrzej LukowskiHas the Traverse suffered from weight of expectation?

The celebrated Edinburgh venue has come under critical fire after a flurry of its fringe shows failed to make a mark. But, asks Andrzej Lukowski, is that really fair when a system of ‘press days’ sets its own trap?

Jo Crowley: ‘We’re interested in the work hiding between the cracks’

Few producers fight for the independent sector as vigorously as Jo Crowley, director of the Total Theatre Awards. Matt Trueman asks her about the difficulties and rewards of operating outside the larger, funded organisations.

The Shakespeare Revue: ‘Audiences still love revues – you just need versatile actors’

It started out as a fundraising act, but The Shakespeare Revue bloomed into a global hit for the Royal Shakespeare Company. More than 20 years later, it’s back. Co-creator Malcolm McKee tells Nick Smurthwaite why the show has led him on a worldwide adventure and why its success lies in the enduring appeal of old-school variety.

International: Sven Ratzke – A golden year of cabaret hot spots around the world

Sven Ratzke in Starman. Photo: Hanneke Wetzer
Sven Ratzke in Starman. Photo: Hanneke Wetzer

Dutch cabaret performer Sven Ratzke is wowing Edinburgh with his appearances in Starman, a homage to David Bowie. As he prepares to take the show around the globe, he tells Paul Vale about his take on the late superstar and where he thinks cabaret is headed.

Backstage: Can you make a living in theatre design?

Even for those at the top of their game, designing productions can be a precarious existence. Award-winning designer Max Jones tells Nick Smurthwaite how he copes with the pressures of the job.

The Archive: ‘When it was going well he’d start singing’

Shivaun O’Casey tells Nick Smurthwaite about growing up with her famous playwright father, Sean, and reflects on which of his plays she feels have been neglected and the interpretations that work best.

0818-Page-1-for-webPlus…

Stephanie Street ‘My name is Stephanie, and I am a pregnant actor’
Jamie Hendry Impossible’s ‘copycat’ critics ignore its revival of magic’
Neil Henry ‘I don’t think for a minute that I’ve nailed it’
Francesca Millican-Slater ‘There’s a lot of worth in doing it all yourself’
The Green Room How do you work on rewrites in rehearsals or previews?Careers Clinic How do I stay focused training abroad?
West End Producer ‘Showpants are essential’

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