Judy Wilson

The Stage
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Actress Judy Wilson had a long career in both provincial and West End theatre and worked with leading directors such as Laurence Olivier, Frank Dunlop and Joan Kemp-Welch. She was also a familiar face on televison notably in the role of Mrs Greenlaw, the housekeper in BBC’s All Creatures Great and Small.

Born in 1938 she trained at the Northern Theatre School and went on to work with leading repertories throughout the UK. She played leading parts at the Oldham Coliseum including the title role in Driving Miss Daisy, Mrs Danvers in Rebecca and Ethel Christie in Ten Rillington Place. She toured for David Wood in several children’s plays and appeared at the Theatr Clywd, the Wolsey, Ipswich, Southwold and Derby Playhouse.

At Nottingham Playhouse she starred as Queenie in Lark Rise and she was Mrs Ottery in Barrie’s Mary Rose at Greenwich Theatre. She played Emily Brent in Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None both in the West End and on tour.

Wilson gave several acclaimed performances at the Young Vic in London under the direction of Frank Dunlop. She played Goneril in King Lear and Emilia in Othello and she was Paulina in Hugh Hunt’s production of The Winter’s Tale.

Laurence Olivier directed her as Katherine in the National Theatre’s Love’s Labours Lost and with the same company she appeared in Back to Methusela (directed by Clifford Williams) and Rites.

Her many televison credits included Casualty, Doctors, Secret Army and Within These Walls.

Close friend Freddie Lees told The Stage: “Everyone loved working with Judy – she had a great zest for life and was blessed with a great sense of humour.”

She died on April 1 after a short illness. She is survived by her son Simon Bell.

Patrick Newley

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